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NaNoWriMo Tips Series (#3): The Aftermath - NaNoWriMo is over, so what did you learn?

Writing a novel is a process. As a writer, you learn by trial, error and practice, what works best for you. During NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), I think most people who attempt the 50,000 word feat find out a few facts about themselves as a writer, including but not limited to the five facts below:1. How much you can truly do when you push and believe in yourself. This is my third time participating and winning NaNo. Although I have never not written 50,000 words, I still am amazed I can do it in one month. Every time it's like discovering I have a secret superpower when I challenge myself.2. If you attended write-ins, you learned when you write surrounded by like-minded individuals, it helps your spirit. You also might have learned during writing downtime, when you were socializing; what other people were writing, useful tips for completing NaNo or you met lots of cool people.
3. You learned what kind of writer you want to be. 
Plotter or panser or a little of both? Wr…

NaNoWriMo Tips Series (#2): Getting Through - Tips for Winning and Reaching a High Word Count

10 Sure-Fire Tips to Surviving November
1. Write every day. Make writing a priority. Set aside time where no one is allowed to disturb you. No one. Put on a writing hat if you have to.
2. Try timed writing exercises. Turn off inner editor and write for 10, 15, 20, 30+ minutes without stopping. 3. Write nonlinearly.Write in whatever order you feel like to keep your creativity fueled. 4. Reward yourself. Buy a gift that makes you happy but is fairly cheap as a reward for reaching goals: chocolate, a cheap book, favorite drink, take out, a new clothing under $15, a mug, etc. 5. Go to write-ins/events.Register and then set home region. Check calendar for events, host own event, if you’re inclined. Writing in a supportive community is helpful in keeping motivated and building relationships. Don't let shame and being behind stop you from writing. Remember whatever word count you end with is more than you started with. 6. Engage in social media.NaNoWriMo has accounts on Twitter and Youtube.…

NaNoWriMo Tips Series (#1): Plotting

I will tell you firsthand I'm not sure how people make it to 50,000 words without outlining a novel first. Yes "pansers" I'm talking to you and humbly bowing down at the same time. Don't get me wrong, if you can pants your way through NaNo then by all means do what works. But if you'd like to change your method, even a little bit and plot beforehand, then read on.

Plotting NaNoWriMo runs during the extremely hectic month of November in which we all are particularly busy with the holiday season and our lives so of course it's hard to fathom carving out any time to write, let alone writing 50,000 words. That's why before NaNo starts I plot a lot so I can skip around to different scenes when I'm under the gun to write a daily word count. It's been my experience, after winning both years I tried, that if I have a scene to write, I can keep pushing toward the 50,000 word count with enthusiasm. Resource: Writers Digest offers these plotting resources.

I Answered A Rant with a Rant but Maybe it will Help Someone Else on Writing a Sequel to an Unpublished Novel

Found you through twitter and decided to answer since I think I have a lot to say on this subject. Not sure if this will help because this is equally a personal rant for me. I am a quick writer who is unpublished. From 2010 to 2015, I have written 7 books plus a prequel and plan on writing about *4 novels and a novella and revising 2 novels this year (I know, crazy!). Writing is my passion and I truly believe one day I will make it. I have so many different stories to tell and mostly they are in the YA genre but regardless they itch to be written and shared.


First I have a few questions, have you had the book professionally edited more than once? Have you revised to the best of your abilities? Have you had beta readers and critiques? Have you tried entering contests with it? I ask these questions because your completed draft should be the best you can make it and these things definitely help contribute. Agents and publishers want a polished manuscript even though they polish it more.…

Writing Conferences & California Writing Retreats

My writing journey has been a slow train of many stops. First it was building my confidence up and just writing. This meant I was no longer thinking about writing or saying I was planning to write a novel, it actually meant I had to write. Pen to paper and fingers to keyboard.


Then I was aimed at getting better at writing (which I will always strive for) so I wrote, I read, I wrote, I read, I researched and I worked with editors and others who could help me hone my craft. This is a repetitive cycle. I have worked with 3 editors from 2012-2015 and have had many beta readers who have helped me along the way. I believe I can learn from anyone; a blogger, an agent, an editor, a writer, a reader, a published author - so I try to meet and network with people who hold these titles.


I also started Nanowrimo in 2013 & continued in 2014. I am proud to say that I have reached the 50,000 word goal each November. Through NaNo I have learned to push past the days I don't want to write in …

#PitMad on Twitter

It's been a little while since I blogged. Glad to be able to write a post again.
I participated in #PitMad for the first time on twitter this week (March 11, 2015) and it was an invigorating experience. I was able to network and found some cool published and unpublished authors who were tweeting like crazy with me. I also got a link to a cool blog and I gained a few followers and followed people as well.
I think at the core #PitMad is about networking with peers. It is also helps to lift the veil that exists between authors and publisher/agent. In #PitMad, aspiring authors searching for agents and publishers tweet in 140 characters or less their book pitch using #PitMad and a short hashtag for their genre. If an agent wants to see more they favorite a tweet. Then the author sends (if they want) their query based on an agent's submission guidelines.
Now you can send most agents (those who aren't closed to queries) and a select few publishers your query on your own of cou…